How to Help an Alcoholic Parent

How to Help an Alcoholic Parent

Find out how to help an alcoholic parent who does not want the help

Alcohol is a dangerous drug, and it is something that affects families nationwide. According to the National Institute on Alcohol Abuse and Alcoholism, 16 million people are suffering from an Alcohol Use Disorder in the United States. If you are feeling alone and are asking yourself "how to help an alcoholic parent in denial," take a deep breath, explore your options, and begin finding out how to help an alcoholic parent.

There are many treatments available to help your parent, call 813-283-4305 and find help with how to help an alcohol parent, especially one that is in denial. Hear your options.

When does alcohol become a problem?

There is a fine line between use and abuse of alcohol. If you fear that your parent is suffering from an alcohol abuse problem and you are wondering how to help an alcoholic parent who doesn't want help, you can ask yourself the following questions.

These questions are taken from the National Institute on Alcohol Abuse and Alcoholism and their page related to Alcohol Use Disorder.

  • Have you noticed that you parent drank more alcohol than they initially intended?
  • Have you noticed your parent drink a longer amount of time than they intended?
  • Have you watched your parent try to stop drinking, or cut down on drinking, but not be able to?
  • Does your parent spend a lot of time drinking alcohol?
  • Is your parent frequently sick the day after drinking a lot of alcohol?
  • Have you noticed that when you parent drinks, it effects your life at home or with your family?
  • Have you noticed that when your parent is drinking, their duties as a parent changes? Such as duties related to meals, school, your events?
  • Does your parent continue to drink even if they know that it causes a problem with your family or their friends?
  • Have you noticed that your parent has given up activities (hobbies) that they liked to do at one time, in order to be able to drink?
  • Have you seen or heard that your parent found themselves in dangerous situations that increased their chances of getting hurt, because they were drinking?
  • Does your parent drink so much that they forget things that they have done or said?
  • Have you noticed that your parent seems mad or upset when they aren't drinking alcohol?
  • Have you noticed that your parent seems sad or depressed when they are not drinking?
  • Have you noticed that each time your parent drinks, they seem to drink more to be able to become drunk?
  • Have you noticed that when your parent isn't drinking their hands shake or they get upset easily?

If you found yourself responding positively to any of these questions, please consider your options for finding the answers of how to help an alcoholic who doesn't want help.

How to help an alcoholic who doesn't want help

If you have asked yourself "how to help an alcoholic parent" or "how to help an alcoholic parent in denial," please know that this is a difficult topic at any age. If you are an adolescent and are seeking help with how to help an alcoholic who doesn't want help, it is recommended that you speak with another family member about the topic and approach your parent together to talk to them about their options.

It is best to approach someone struggling with an alcohol abuse problem when they have recently stated that they should cut back or stop drinking. It is also very important that when you are speaking with your parent, you let them know that you are concerned, but more than willing to help them through each and every step of getting better.

If you find yourself alone and in a dangerous situation with your parent who has maybe had too much to drink, make sure to call a family member or a friend. Stay with this person or have them come and stay with you, do not put yourself in danger.

Finding help for an alcoholic parent is possible, as well as speaking to them about the problem. Remember, you can always call a treatment center for help or advice, they are there to help.

 

 

Source:

https://www.niaaa.nih.gov/alcohol-health/overview-alcohol-consumption/alcohol-use-disorders

 

Alcohol Rehab